Homepage / Live sessions agenda

PROGRAMME TIMES ARE IN UTC

08:00
08:30
09:00
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Prime Channel

08:00 - 08:30

Opening

Plenary session

Opening

08:00 - 08:30

Welcome to the conference

Speaker(s):

Linda-Gail Bekker (South Africa) served as IAS President (2016- 2018). She co-chaired the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris, France and the 22nd International AIDS conference 2018 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Linda-Gail Bekker is Deputy Director, Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa. She is the Chief Operating Officer of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation.



A physician scientist and infectious disease specialist, Professor Bekker’s research interests include programmatic antiretroviral roll out, HIV/tuberculosis integration, and HIV prevention in women, youth, and men who have sex with men. She is Principal Investigator of UCT’s Clinical Trials Unit (UCTCTU) and is actively involved in the work of the 4 associated UCTCTU clinical research sites and NIH Division of AIDS (DAIDS) networks. She has chaired protocols for the HIV Vaccine Trials Network and the HIV Prevention Trials Network and been Investigator of Record in a number of network-related protocols. She heads up the Desmond Tutu Centre of Adolescent Health and Wellbeing aimed at developing the adolescent HIV/TB/STI treatment and prevention evidence base to inform adolescent-friendly sexual and reproductive service platforms.


Adeeba Kamarulzaman of Malaysia became the first Asian President of IAS – the International AIDS Society , on 11 July 2020 when she began her two year term.



A graduate of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, trained in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Adeeba Kamarulzaman is currently Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya, an Adjunct Associate Professor at Yale University, USA. She established the Infectious Diseases Unit at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and, in 2008, the Centre of Excellence for Research in AIDS (CERiA) at the same university.



As convener of the Malaysian Harm Reduction Working Group of the Malaysian AIDS Council, she successfully advocated for the implementation of harm reduction measures to tackle HIV amongst people who inject drugs in Malaysia. She was President of the Malaysian AIDS Council from 2006 to 2010 where she remains an Executive Committee member. She also serves as Chairwoman of the Malaysian AIDS Foundation.



Adeeba Kamarulzaman has been involved in several regional and international organizations including TREAT Asia, the International Society of Infectious Diseases, and was Co-Chair of the WHO Strategic and Technical Advisory Committee on HIV and is presently a member of the UNAIDS Advisory Group. She was the Scientific Co-Chair of the 18th International AIDS Conference in Vienna in 2010 and local chair of the 7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (now IAS Conference on HIV Science) in Kuala Lumpur in 2013. In April 2015 she received an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from her alma mater, Monash University, for her outstanding achievements in medicine.


Plenary session

09:00 - 10:00

Understanding the basics of SARS-CoV2 to inform new prevention and treatment strategies

Plenary session

Understanding the basics of SARS-CoV2 to inform new prevention and treatment strategies

09:00 - 09:15

SARS-CoV2 virology: Understanding where and how the virus replicates

Speaker(s):
D. PURCELL
09:15 - 09:30

The origin of SARS-CoV2: Bats, pangolins, rodents or more?

Speaker(s):

Linfa Wang, PhD, is the director of the Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases at Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.



Having completed his Bachelor's degree in 1982 at the East China Normal University in Shanghai, Wang went on to obtain his PhD at the University of California, Davis. His early research was at the Monash Centre for Molecular Biology and Medicine. In 1990, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL), where he played a leading role in identifying bats as the natural host of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus.



His research then extended from bat-borne viruses to bettering understanding virus-bat interaction, and he led an international team carrying out comparative genomic analysis of two bat species. They discovered an important link between adaptation to flight and bats' ability to counter DNA damage repair as a result of fast metabolism and to co-exist with a large number of viruses without developing clinical diseases.



Wang's work has been recognized internationally through various international awards, numerous invited speeches at major international conferences and many top scientific publications, including Science, Nature, Nature Reviews in Microbiology, Lancet Infectious Diseases and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), along with five patents and many invited book chapters.



He holds a number of honorary positions and memberships and has received numerous awards such as the 2014 Eureka Prize for Research in Infectious Diseases. In 2010, Wang was elected as a fellow of Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in recognition of his expertise in new and emerging diseases.



Wang is also active internationally by serving on various editorial boards for publication in the areas of virology, microbiology and infectious diseases. He is currently the editor-in-chief of the Virology Journal.


09:30 - 09:45

Understanding the immune response to SARS-CoV2

Speaker(s):

Dr. Galit Alter is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a Group Leader at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard.



 



Dr. Alter’s work focuses on the development of systems biology tools to define the correlates of immunity against infectious diseases that ravage the globe. To this end, Dr. Alter developed a novel, ever-evolving approach to probing humoral immunity that she termed ‘systems serology’. Dr. Alter uses this novel -omics platform to profile the remarkable diversity of antibodies generated in response to pathogens or vaccines and their abilities to leverage the immune system to fight disease. Capturing hundreds of datapoints, this approach provides unprecedented resolution into the unique humoral immune fingerprints that exist among individuals. Her group then interrogates these antibody profiles, using machine learning and other high dimensional tools to define the specific antibody profiles/features that track with favorable patient outcomes in diseases such as HIV, Ebola virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, malaria, etc. These data raise often unexpected hypotheses on antibody mechanism of action that have led to the accelerated understanding of new therapeutic or vaccine-design approaches.


09:45 - 10:00

Live panel discussion

Speaker(s):

Sharon Lewin (Australia) is the IAS President-Elect. She is an infectious diseases physician and basic scientist, and has worked in HIV-related clinical medicine and research for over 25years. She is the director of the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity.



Lewin is an active clinician, working at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne and a Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne. Lewin is internationally recognised for her expertise in the field of HIV cure, HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection and immune recovery post ART. She has over 250 publications, predominately related to HIV cure and understanding HIV disease and related co-infections including HBV, cryptococcal infection and cytomegalovirus. She is one of four editors for the journal AIDS and on the editorial board of Lancet HIV.



She has been involved with the International AIDS Society (IAS) as a member since 2007, when she was deputy chair of the 4th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention held in Sydney, Australia. She was the local co-chair for the 20th International AIDS Conference held in Melbourne in 2014. As local Co-Chair, she was able to leverage significant in-kind and financial support from the Australian and Victorian Governments and the city of Melbourne.



She also co-chairs the advisory board for the IAS Towards an HIV Cure initiative. She is a member of the council of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia, the peak funding body for medical research in Australia and chairs the NHMRC’s Health Translation Advisory Committee. She is a member of the governing board of the International Coalition for the Elimination of Hepatitis B virus (ICE-HBV) and a member of the leadership committee of the Global Virology Network. She was previously President of the Australian Society for HIV Medicine. She is a member of the Strategic Technical Advisory Committee to the Director, HIV Program, World Health Organisation, and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board to the director of UNAIDS.


D. PURCELL

Linfa Wang, PhD, is the director of the Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases at Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.



Having completed his Bachelor's degree in 1982 at the East China Normal University in Shanghai, Wang went on to obtain his PhD at the University of California, Davis. His early research was at the Monash Centre for Molecular Biology and Medicine. In 1990, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL), where he played a leading role in identifying bats as the natural host of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus.



His research then extended from bat-borne viruses to bettering understanding virus-bat interaction, and he led an international team carrying out comparative genomic analysis of two bat species. They discovered an important link between adaptation to flight and bats' ability to counter DNA damage repair as a result of fast metabolism and to co-exist with a large number of viruses without developing clinical diseases.



Wang's work has been recognized internationally through various international awards, numerous invited speeches at major international conferences and many top scientific publications, including Science, Nature, Nature Reviews in Microbiology, Lancet Infectious Diseases and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), along with five patents and many invited book chapters.



He holds a number of honorary positions and memberships and has received numerous awards such as the 2014 Eureka Prize for Research in Infectious Diseases. In 2010, Wang was elected as a fellow of Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in recognition of his expertise in new and emerging diseases.



Wang is also active internationally by serving on various editorial boards for publication in the areas of virology, microbiology and infectious diseases. He is currently the editor-in-chief of the Virology Journal.


Dr. Galit Alter is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a Group Leader at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard.



 



Dr. Alter’s work focuses on the development of systems biology tools to define the correlates of immunity against infectious diseases that ravage the globe. To this end, Dr. Alter developed a novel, ever-evolving approach to probing humoral immunity that she termed ‘systems serology’. Dr. Alter uses this novel -omics platform to profile the remarkable diversity of antibodies generated in response to pathogens or vaccines and their abilities to leverage the immune system to fight disease. Capturing hundreds of datapoints, this approach provides unprecedented resolution into the unique humoral immune fingerprints that exist among individuals. Her group then interrogates these antibody profiles, using machine learning and other high dimensional tools to define the specific antibody profiles/features that track with favorable patient outcomes in diseases such as HIV, Ebola virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, malaria, etc. These data raise often unexpected hypotheses on antibody mechanism of action that have led to the accelerated understanding of new therapeutic or vaccine-design approaches.


Plenary session

11:00 - 12:00

COVID-19 and the policy response

Plenary session

COVID-19 and the policy response

11:00 - 11:30

Panel 1: Ensuring equitable access/Financing to address COVID-19 (diagnostics, therapeutics, PPE, vaccines)

Speaker(s):

A former Chief Executive Officer of Standard Chartered PLC, one of the world’s leading international banks, Sands has been a research fellow at Harvard University since 2015, dividing his time between the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Global Health Institute, working on a range of research projects in financial markets and regulation, fintech and global health.


Jennifer Kates (USA) is the IAS Governing Council Treasurer. She is Vice President and Director of Global Health & HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, where she oversees the Foundation’s policy analysis and research focused on the U.S. government’s role in global health and on the global and domestic HIV epidemics. Widely regarded as an expert in the field, she regularly publishes and presents on global health and HIV policy issues and is particularly known for her work analyzing donor government investments in global health; assessing and mapping the U.S. government’s global health architecture, programs, and funding; and tracking and analyzing major U.S. HIV programs and financing, and key trends in the HIV epidemic, an area she has been working in for close to thirty years.



Prior to joining the Foundation in 1998, Dr. Kates was a Senior Associate with The Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm, where she focused on HIV policy, strategic planning/health systems analysis, and health care for vulnerable populations. Among other prior positions, she directed the Office of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns at Princeton University.Dr. Kates serves on numerous federal and private sector advisory committees on global health and HIV issues, and is currently amember of PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board, the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, and the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment (CHACHSPT). In addition, she serves as an Alternate Board Member of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.Dr. Kates received her Ph.D. in Health Policy from George Washington University.



She holds a Bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College, a Master’s degree in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and a Master’s degree in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts. She is currently a lecturer at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.


Since 2011, I have been proudly serving Gavi as its CEO. During this time my focus has been to use my experience, as an epidemiologist and expert in vaccine development, to lead Gavi in its mission to improve access to new and underused vaccines and improve coverage and equity in poor countries. Under my leadership, in 2015 Gavi successfully raised US$ 7.5 billion in commitments during its last replenishment and has helped to reduce vaccine prices and assure a healthy vaccine market. This supported Gavi’s largest expansion, immunising an additional 300 million of the world’s poorest children and preventing 5-6 million deaths.



By continuing to increase immunisation coverage, we will not only save more lives, but will also help lift millions of lives out of poverty. We will also build out the health system to deliver vaccines to the underserved, extending the base of the pyramid for primary healthcare. We continue to seek innovative ways to improve vaccination and by helping countries to improve outbreak response we are also reducing the threats to global health security. All this will prepare Gavi for what is likely to be its most challenging strategic period, post-2020, while providing solid foundations for the global health community as it takes on the most ambitious new global agenda with the Sustainable Development Goals.



As a global health leader, my mandate is very clear: to ensure that no one is left behind, by creating a world where life-saving vaccines are available to everyone who needs them, regardless of their ability to pay.


Fatima Hassan is a human rights lawyer and social justice activist and the founder of the HJI. She is the former Executive Director of the Open Society Foundation for South Africa (OSF-SA), heading the Foundation for 6 years (mid-2013 - mid-2019). She has dedicated her professional life to defending and promoting human rights in South Africa, especially in the field of HIV/AIDS where she worked for the AIDS Law Project and also acted for the Treatment Action Campaign in many of its legal cases. She has a BA and LL.B from the University of the Witwatersrand and an LL.M from Duke University. She clerked at the Constitutional Court of South Africa for Justice Kate O'Regan and has served as the Special Adviser to former Minister Barbara Hogan (Health; Public Enterprises). She is a former co-director and a founding Trustee of Ndifuna Ukwazi, and previously served on the Boards of the Raith Foundation; SA Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF-SA); the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC); and the SA Council for Medical Schemes. She is currently serving on the Board of Global Witness. She is the recipient of several fellowships and awards, including the Franklin Thomas SA Constitutional Court Fellowship; and the Tom and Andi Bernstein Distinguished Human Rights Fellowship at Yale University’s School of Law.


11:30 - 11:45

Panel 2 : Policy choices & impacts: Effects of lockdowns, border closures, and other non-pharmacological interventions

Speaker(s):

Jennifer Kates (USA) is the IAS Governing Council Treasurer. She is Vice President and Director of Global Health & HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, where she oversees the Foundation’s policy analysis and research focused on the U.S. government’s role in global health and on the global and domestic HIV epidemics. Widely regarded as an expert in the field, she regularly publishes and presents on global health and HIV policy issues and is particularly known for her work analyzing donor government investments in global health; assessing and mapping the U.S. government’s global health architecture, programs, and funding; and tracking and analyzing major U.S. HIV programs and financing, and key trends in the HIV epidemic, an area she has been working in for close to thirty years.



Prior to joining the Foundation in 1998, Dr. Kates was a Senior Associate with The Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm, where she focused on HIV policy, strategic planning/health systems analysis, and health care for vulnerable populations. Among other prior positions, she directed the Office of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns at Princeton University.Dr. Kates serves on numerous federal and private sector advisory committees on global health and HIV issues, and is currently amember of PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board, the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, and the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment (CHACHSPT). In addition, she serves as an Alternate Board Member of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.Dr. Kates received her Ph.D. in Health Policy from George Washington University.



She holds a Bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College, a Master’s degree in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and a Master’s degree in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts. She is currently a lecturer at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.


Devi Sridhar is a Professor at the University of Edinburgh where she holds a Personal Chair in Global Public Health.  She is Founding Director of the Global Health Governance Programme and holds a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award.



Recipient of a Rhodes scholarship, Devi holds an MPhil and a DPhil from Oxford University as well as a B.S. from the University of Miami's Honors Medical Program. Prior to her appointment at Edinburgh, she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford University and an Associate Professor in Global Health Politics and Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford University.



Devi is the author of two books—"Governing Global Health: Who Runs the World and Why?" (OUP, 2017) and "The Battle against Hunger: Choice, Circumstance and the World Bank" (OUP, 2007)—and has published her work in Nature, Science, the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet and the British Medical Journal.


11:45 - 12:00

Stigma/harm reduction and COVID-19

Speaker(s):

Jennifer Kates (USA) is the IAS Governing Council Treasurer. She is Vice President and Director of Global Health & HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, where she oversees the Foundation’s policy analysis and research focused on the U.S. government’s role in global health and on the global and domestic HIV epidemics. Widely regarded as an expert in the field, she regularly publishes and presents on global health and HIV policy issues and is particularly known for her work analyzing donor government investments in global health; assessing and mapping the U.S. government’s global health architecture, programs, and funding; and tracking and analyzing major U.S. HIV programs and financing, and key trends in the HIV epidemic, an area she has been working in for close to thirty years.



Prior to joining the Foundation in 1998, Dr. Kates was a Senior Associate with The Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm, where she focused on HIV policy, strategic planning/health systems analysis, and health care for vulnerable populations. Among other prior positions, she directed the Office of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns at Princeton University.Dr. Kates serves on numerous federal and private sector advisory committees on global health and HIV issues, and is currently amember of PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board, the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, and the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment (CHACHSPT). In addition, she serves as an Alternate Board Member of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.Dr. Kates received her Ph.D. in Health Policy from George Washington University.



She holds a Bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College, a Master’s degree in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and a Master’s degree in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts. She is currently a lecturer at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.


Julia Marcus, PhD, MPH is an infectious disease epidemiologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, and Adjunct Faculty at The Fenway Institute. Her research focuses on improving the implementation of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent new HIV infections and promote sexual health in the U.S. Her studies have leveraged data from electronic health records (EHRs) to identify patients who may benefit from PrEP, characterize PrEP uptake and continuation, and document clinical outcomes among PrEP users in real-world healthcare settings. She is leading multiple implementation projects to evaluate whether EHR-based predictive analytics and clinical decision support can improve PrEP prescribing in diverse healthcare settings.


Plenary session

13:00 - 14:00

Nonpharmaceutical considerations in the prevention of COVID-19

Plenary session

Nonpharmaceutical considerations in the prevention of COVID-19

13:00 - 13:15

The importance of airborne transmission

Speaker(s):

Lidia Morawska is a Professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Faculty of Science & Engineering, Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, the Director of the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health (ILAQH) at QUT, which is a WHO Collaborating Centre on Air Quality and Health, and a Co-Director in Australia for the , Australia – China Centre for Air Quality Science and Management (ACC – AQSM). She conducts fundamental and applied research in the interdisciplinary field of air quality and its impact on human health and the environment, with a specific focus on science of airborne particulate matter. Professor Morawska is a physicist and received her doctorate at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland for research on radon and its progeny.  Prior to joining QUT she spent several years in Canada conducting research first at McMaster University in Hamiltonas a Fellow of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and later at the University of Toronto. Professor Morawska is an author of over six hundred journal papers, book chapters and conference papers. She has also been involved at the executive level with a number of relevant national and international professional bodies and has been acting as an advisor to the World Health Organization. She is a past President of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate.


13:15 - 13:30

The role of modelling or COVID modelling: Help or hindrance?

Speaker(s):

Professor Jodie McVernon is a physician with subspecialty qualifications in public health and vaccinology. She has extensive expertise in clinical vaccine trials, epidemiologic studies and mathematical modelling of infectious diseases, gained at the University of Oxford, Health Protection Agency London and The University of Melbourne. Her work focuses on the application of a range of cross-disciplinary methodological approaches including mathematical and computational models, to synthesise insights from basic biology, epidemiological data and sociological research. These models advance understanding of the observed epidemiology of infectious diseases and inform understanding of optimal interventions for disease control.


13:30 - 14:00

Live panel discussion

Speaker(s):

Lidia Morawska is a Professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Faculty of Science & Engineering, Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, the Director of the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health (ILAQH) at QUT, which is a WHO Collaborating Centre on Air Quality and Health, and a Co-Director in Australia for the , Australia – China Centre for Air Quality Science and Management (ACC – AQSM). She conducts fundamental and applied research in the interdisciplinary field of air quality and its impact on human health and the environment, with a specific focus on science of airborne particulate matter. Professor Morawska is a physicist and received her doctorate at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland for research on radon and its progeny.  Prior to joining QUT she spent several years in Canada conducting research first at McMaster University in Hamiltonas a Fellow of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and later at the University of Toronto. Professor Morawska is an author of over six hundred journal papers, book chapters and conference papers. She has also been involved at the executive level with a number of relevant national and international professional bodies and has been acting as an advisor to the World Health Organization. She is a past President of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate.


Professor Jodie McVernon is a physician with subspecialty qualifications in public health and vaccinology. She has extensive expertise in clinical vaccine trials, epidemiologic studies and mathematical modelling of infectious diseases, gained at the University of Oxford, Health Protection Agency London and The University of Melbourne. Her work focuses on the application of a range of cross-disciplinary methodological approaches including mathematical and computational models, to synthesise insights from basic biology, epidemiological data and sociological research. These models advance understanding of the observed epidemiology of infectious diseases and inform understanding of optimal interventions for disease control.


Beatriz Grinsztejn (Brazil) is an IAS Governing Council member is an infectious diseases physician and researcher at the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She is the Director of the STD/AIDS Clinical Research Laboratory and principal investigator of the FIOCRUZ HIV Prevention and Therapeutic Clinical Trials Unit at FIOCRUZ. The unit is affiliated to the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and the ANRS, and implements prevention and therapeutic clinical trials and cohort studies.



Dr Grinsztejn is the Brazilian principal investigator for the Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS. She is a member of the Brazilian Ministry of Health ART and PrEP Advisory Committees, PAHO Technical Advisory Committee and PrEP Task Force, and the UNAIDS Scientific Expert Panel. Dr Grinsztejn is a faculty member of the Masters and PhD Degree Program on Clinical Research in Infectious Diseases at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation.


Plenary session

15:00 - 16:00

Active and passive vaccination to prevent COVID-19 infection and disease

Plenary session

Active and passive vaccination to prevent COVID-19 infection and disease

Moderator: G. SCARLATTI

15:00 - 15:15

Update on SARS-CoV2 vaccine candidates: What do the data show?

Speaker(s):
L. COREY
15:15 - 15:30

Covid-19 and Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)

Speaker(s):

Dr. Myron “Mike” Cohen directs the Institute and serves as associate vice chancellor for global health and medical affairs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An infectious disease specialist, he is widely known for his work on transmission and prevention of HIV. He is the architect and principal investigator of the multinational HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 study which demonstrated that antiretroviral treatment prevents the sexual transmission of HIV-1. The journal Science recognized this work as the “Breakthrough of the Year” in 2011.


15:30 - 16:00

Live panel discussion

Speaker(s):

Dr. Myron “Mike” Cohen directs the Institute and serves as associate vice chancellor for global health and medical affairs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An infectious disease specialist, he is widely known for his work on transmission and prevention of HIV. He is the architect and principal investigator of the multinational HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 study which demonstrated that antiretroviral treatment prevents the sexual transmission of HIV-1. The journal Science recognized this work as the “Breakthrough of the Year” in 2011.


L. COREY

Plenary session

17:00 - 18:00

What's next for the COVID-19 response?

Plenary session

What's next for the COVID-19 response?

17:00 - 18:00

Live debate

Speaker(s):

Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the U.S. National Institutes of Health, where he oversees an extensive research portfolio focused on infectious and immune-mediated diseases.  He serves as one of the key advisors to the White House and Department of Health and Human Services on global HIV/AIDS issues, and on initiatives to bolster medical and public health preparedness against emerging infectious disease threats. He is the winner of numerous prestigious awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Science and the Lasker Award for Public Service.


Sharon Lewin (Australia) is the IAS President-Elect. She is an infectious diseases physician and basic scientist, and has worked in HIV-related clinical medicine and research for over 25years. She is the director of the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity.



Lewin is an active clinician, working at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne and a Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne. Lewin is internationally recognised for her expertise in the field of HIV cure, HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection and immune recovery post ART. She has over 250 publications, predominately related to HIV cure and understanding HIV disease and related co-infections including HBV, cryptococcal infection and cytomegalovirus. She is one of four editors for the journal AIDS and on the editorial board of Lancet HIV.



She has been involved with the International AIDS Society (IAS) as a member since 2007, when she was deputy chair of the 4th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention held in Sydney, Australia. She was the local co-chair for the 20th International AIDS Conference held in Melbourne in 2014. As local Co-Chair, she was able to leverage significant in-kind and financial support from the Australian and Victorian Governments and the city of Melbourne.



She also co-chairs the advisory board for the IAS Towards an HIV Cure initiative. She is a member of the council of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia, the peak funding body for medical research in Australia and chairs the NHMRC’s Health Translation Advisory Committee. She is a member of the governing board of the International Coalition for the Elimination of Hepatitis B virus (ICE-HBV) and a member of the leadership committee of the Global Virology Network. She was previously President of the Australian Society for HIV Medicine. She is a member of the Strategic Technical Advisory Committee to the Director, HIV Program, World Health Organisation, and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board to the director of UNAIDS.


Beatriz Grinsztejn (Brazil) is an IAS Governing Council member is an infectious diseases physician and researcher at the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She is the Director of the STD/AIDS Clinical Research Laboratory and principal investigator of the FIOCRUZ HIV Prevention and Therapeutic Clinical Trials Unit at FIOCRUZ. The unit is affiliated to the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and the ANRS, and implements prevention and therapeutic clinical trials and cohort studies.



Dr Grinsztejn is the Brazilian principal investigator for the Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS. She is a member of the Brazilian Ministry of Health ART and PrEP Advisory Committees, PAHO Technical Advisory Committee and PrEP Task Force, and the UNAIDS Scientific Expert Panel. Dr Grinsztejn is a faculty member of the Masters and PhD Degree Program on Clinical Research in Infectious Diseases at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation.


Jennifer Kates (USA) is the IAS Governing Council Treasurer. She is Vice President and Director of Global Health & HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, where she oversees the Foundation’s policy analysis and research focused on the U.S. government’s role in global health and on the global and domestic HIV epidemics. Widely regarded as an expert in the field, she regularly publishes and presents on global health and HIV policy issues and is particularly known for her work analyzing donor government investments in global health; assessing and mapping the U.S. government’s global health architecture, programs, and funding; and tracking and analyzing major U.S. HIV programs and financing, and key trends in the HIV epidemic, an area she has been working in for close to thirty years.



Prior to joining the Foundation in 1998, Dr. Kates was a Senior Associate with The Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm, where she focused on HIV policy, strategic planning/health systems analysis, and health care for vulnerable populations. Among other prior positions, she directed the Office of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns at Princeton University.Dr. Kates serves on numerous federal and private sector advisory committees on global health and HIV issues, and is currently amember of PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board, the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, and the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment (CHACHSPT). In addition, she serves as an Alternate Board Member of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.Dr. Kates received her Ph.D. in Health Policy from George Washington University.



She holds a Bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College, a Master’s degree in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and a Master’s degree in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts. She is currently a lecturer at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.


Linda-Gail Bekker (South Africa) served as IAS President (2016- 2018). She co-chaired the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris, France and the 22nd International AIDS conference 2018 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Linda-Gail Bekker is Deputy Director, Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa. She is the Chief Operating Officer of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation.



A physician scientist and infectious disease specialist, Professor Bekker’s research interests include programmatic antiretroviral roll out, HIV/tuberculosis integration, and HIV prevention in women, youth, and men who have sex with men. She is Principal Investigator of UCT’s Clinical Trials Unit (UCTCTU) and is actively involved in the work of the 4 associated UCTCTU clinical research sites and NIH Division of AIDS (DAIDS) networks. She has chaired protocols for the HIV Vaccine Trials Network and the HIV Prevention Trials Network and been Investigator of Record in a number of network-related protocols. She heads up the Desmond Tutu Centre of Adolescent Health and Wellbeing aimed at developing the adolescent HIV/TB/STI treatment and prevention evidence base to inform adolescent-friendly sexual and reproductive service platforms.


Adeeba Kamarulzaman of Malaysia became the first Asian President of IAS – the International AIDS Society , on 11 July 2020 when she began her two year term.



A graduate of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, trained in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Adeeba Kamarulzaman is currently Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya, an Adjunct Associate Professor at Yale University, USA. She established the Infectious Diseases Unit at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and, in 2008, the Centre of Excellence for Research in AIDS (CERiA) at the same university.



As convener of the Malaysian Harm Reduction Working Group of the Malaysian AIDS Council, she successfully advocated for the implementation of harm reduction measures to tackle HIV amongst people who inject drugs in Malaysia. She was President of the Malaysian AIDS Council from 2006 to 2010 where she remains an Executive Committee member. She also serves as Chairwoman of the Malaysian AIDS Foundation.



Adeeba Kamarulzaman has been involved in several regional and international organizations including TREAT Asia, the International Society of Infectious Diseases, and was Co-Chair of the WHO Strategic and Technical Advisory Committee on HIV and is presently a member of the UNAIDS Advisory Group. She was the Scientific Co-Chair of the 18th International AIDS Conference in Vienna in 2010 and local chair of the 7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (now IAS Conference on HIV Science) in Kuala Lumpur in 2013. In April 2015 she received an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from her alma mater, Monash University, for her outstanding achievements in medicine.


Plenary session